Blog

New Beginnings

It’s been so long since I’ve posted here or updated this site I almost forgot how the WP back-end works, yikes!  I hereby acknowledge I have been remiss and offer a formal mea culpa.  I have projects and experiments on my desk that warrant a post or three, some musical discoveries, and lots of news to share.  I won’t be able to cover all of that now, but I have some exciting news I’d like to share. First, I couldn’t be happier to announce that I have been appointed as a full-time Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at …

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Fun with the Wien Bridge Oscillator

To the fledgling electronics enthusiast who has just enough knowledge of electronic music theory to be dangerous, it makes sense that the simplest tone, the sine tone, should be the simplest/easiest to construct in the analog electronics domain.  Of course, this is not the case.  While geometrically simple to describe, the sine tone is not easily achieved using electronic components.  Most designs found online indicate that the most common method is to “filter” a square wave created by an op-amp through a given set of components placed between the output, the non-inverting input, and the ground.  This is the method …

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DIY Workshop Madness

I am really excited to be teaching a series of open source software and hardware workshops this year at Yale as part of a new initiative we started called the Open Music Initiative.  The aim of the initiative is to indoctrinat… er, expose faculty and students to the merits of FLOSS and open source hardware via workshops wherein attendees will get hands-on experience working with, and more importantly making music with open source technologies.  Additionally, it is my hope that the initiative will eventually become a self-sustaining endeavor largely operated and promulgated by members of the Yale community.

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Modular Synth Components

Last night El MuCo (The Mutagenic Cooptoraptors) accomplished a feat heretofore unimaginable: three circuit projects were undertaken and three projects were completed successfully.  While you may be tempted to think that, with the assistance of a book (Ray Wilson’s Analog Synthesizers) and the vast power of the internet this is not a big deal, you could not be more mistaken. Not only because of our chronic electronic ineptitude, but because even getting all the parts together for this much electronic awesome is daunting.  Of course, we didn’t have all the right parts, but we did it anyway because SCOFFING AT CONVENTION IS OUR …

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Music V: Back to the Future

In 1969 Max Mathews published The Technology of Computer Music in which he provides a  primer to digital sound and synthesis, describes the function of a computer music program, and provides a manual to the language he was describing, namely MUSIC V. It was to be the last MUSIC-N language he would write, and was the culmination of audio programming innovation that Mathews began in 1957 when he created the series of programs that formed MUSIC.

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Intro to SuperCollider 3 for the Uninitiated

There are so many good tutorials, books, and websites out there for learning SuperCollider that one may scoff at “yet another…” SuperCollider intro and for good reason.  This article, however, aims to answer really basic questions at the absolute beginner level, questions such as “ok, but how do I get SuperCollider and what version do I want?”  I will present information in the form of an extended FAQ largely based on questions I have answered over and over again. 

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SuperCollider on CrunchBang Linux

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[UPDATE] This post has been updated to reflect better practices.

Following my post for installing SC3.6 on Ubuntu (Xubuntu) where I advised readers of the awesomeness of #! (CrunchBang) linux I have decided to post a quick how-to for getting SC3.6 IDE installed on your CrunchBang system.

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New SuperCollider on (x)Ubuntu

My page on installing SC3.x on Ubuntu has been a popular page here at scacinto.com. Because it was written 3+ years ago, and more importantly, because so much changed with the SC3.6 update I felt compelled to write up another tut. This time I’m installed 3.6.x on Xubuntu 13.10. The flavor of Ubuntu you choose doesn’t matter. I like X because it uses the lighter XFCE desktop environment. Actually, I like and use #! Linux more, but Ubuntu is the easier and more people use it (even though #! is better!) so here goes:

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Experimental Musical Instrument Workshop @MakeHaven

Yesterday was the 2nd of what will now be three workshops I’m giving at MakeHaven hacker space in New Haven, CT. The first two focused on creating contact mics and designing and building acoustic instruments. The third workshop, TBA sometime in October, will center on basics of electronics and circuits, bending/hacking instruments, toys, household objects, etc, and then interfacing the analog with the digital via Arduino. If you are interested in coming to the third workshop, please leave a comment below, or go to www.makehaven.org to check out the event. (You do not need to have attended parts 1 and …

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